Racial patterns of dating and marriage

06 Dec

The study, released in the middle of December, found a rise in interracial relationships especially with Asians, Hispanics, and Native Indians/Alaskan Natives.But whites and blacks are also marrying other races more today than in the past. For instance, Asian women were far more apt to marry white or black men than Asian men were to find a relationship outside their race.Older Americans are not as tolerant: About 55 percent of those ages 50 to 64 and just 38 percent of those 65 or older said they would not mind if a family member married someone of another race.

“Newly married” or “newlyweds” refer to couples who got married in the past 12 months prior to the survey date (American Community Survey).(August 2010) When Ann Dunham, a white woman, married a black African student, Barack Obama Sr., in 1961, marriage between white and black Americans was rare. In 2010, with Barack Obama Jr., in the White House, attitudes toward interracial dating and marriage are very different.Less than 3 percent of all marriages were interracial in 1960, and the public generally disapproved of such unions. Not surprisingly, this transformation is most evident among young people.This ranking scheme illustrates the manner in which the barriers against desegregation fell: Of less importance was the segregation in basic public facilities, which was abolished with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down in 1967 by the Supreme Court ruling in the landmark Loving v. Social enterprise research conducted on behalf of the Columbia Business School (2005–2007) showed that regional differences within the United States in how interracial relationships are perceived have persisted: Daters of both sexes from south of the Mason–Dixon line were found to have much stronger same-race preferences than northern daters did.